^ Jump up to: a b "QQ chat rooms gain on dating agencies". China Daily. 2007-08-15. Retrieved 2010-12-09. The Internet QQ chat room is challenging traditional dating agencies ... more than 20,000 members. ... The QQ user groups charge little for service in comparison with traditional dating agencies, that usually collect 100 (US$13) to 200 yuan (US$26) per introduction.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h Madden, Mary Research Specialist; Lenhart, Amanda Senior Research Specialist (September 2005). "Online Dating: Americans who are seeking romance use the internet to help them in their search, but there is still widespread public concern about the safety of online dating". Pew Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved 2010-12-08.

The majority of Indian marriages are arranged by parents and relatives, and one estimate is that 7 of every 10 marriages are arranged.[95] Sometimes the bride and groom don't meet until the wedding, and there is no courtship or wooing before the joining.[72] In the past, it meant that couples were chosen from the same caste and religion and economic status.[96] There is widespread support for arranged marriages generally. Writer Lavina Melwani described a happy marriage which had been arranged by the bride's father, and noted that during the engagement, the woman was allowed to go out with him before they were married on only one occasion; the couple married and found happiness.[97] Supporters of arranged marriage suggest that there is a risk of having the marriage fall apart whether it was arranged by relatives or by the couple themselves, and that what's important is not how the marriage came to be but what the couple does after being married.[97] Parents and relatives exert considerable influence, sometimes posting matrimonial ads in newspapers and online.[96] Customs encourage families to put people together, and discourage sexual experimentation as well as so-called serial courtship in which a prospective bride or groom dates but continually rejects possible partners, since the interests of the family are seen as more important than the romantic needs of the people marrying.[2] Indian writers, such as Mistry in his book Family Matters, sometimes depict arranged marriages as unhappy.[98] Writer Sarita Sarvate of India Currents thinks people calculate their "value" on the "Indian marriage market" according to measures such as family status, and that arranged marriages typically united spouses who often didn't love each other.[99] She suggested love was out of place in this world because it risked passion and "sordid" sexual liaisons.[99] Love, as she sees it, is "Waking up in the morning and thinking about someone."[99] Writer Jennifer Marshall described the wife in an arranged marriage as living in a world of solitude without much happiness, and feeling pressured by relatives to conceive a son so she wouldn't be considered as "barren" by her husband's family; in this sense, the arranged marriage didn't bring "love, happiness, and companionship."[100] Writer Vijaysree Venkatraman believes arranged marriages are unlikely to disappear soon, commenting in his book review of Shoba Narayan's Monsoon Diary, which has a detailed description of the steps involved in a present-day arranged marriage.[101] There are indications that even the institution of arranged marriages is changing, with marriages increasingly being arranged by "unknown, unfamiliar sources" and less based on local families who know each other.[95] Writer Lavina Melwani in Little India compared Indian marriages to business deals:
^ Jump up to: a b Casey Schwartz (August 26, 2016). "Sex and Dating: Now the Thinking Gal's Subject: The writer Emily Witt in the woods near her family's home in rural New Hampshire, where she often retreats to write". The New York Times. Retrieved August 29, 2016. ...At 30, the writer Emily Witt found herself single and heartbroken ... intent on examining the mythology around how life for women ... Ms. Witt, now 35. ... nonfiction seeks to blend personal writing with social analysis...
My experience has been similar to what has been experienced by many on online dating. One thing it can do is help others who or shy or introverted to take a chance and work on your communication or have to the nerve to start a conversation. It think that the marketing of these sites doesn't help as does ones expectations. I have only met a few women online and while it haven't had any success yet, I wouldn't have met them otherwise. From what I have observed is that people met their partner in all kinds of places like at a concert, a party, or other social settings. Sometimes people meet each other in volunteering or taking up courses. I have tried these ways as well, and while I haven't been successful, I have had a lot of fun. Whatever I do here has to at least be enjoyable and fun, because if it isn't, then why bother.
The common theme of the advice here was “Be pragmatic.” If the wife is a lawyer and spends 50 hours at the office every week, and the husband is an artist and can work from home most days, it makes more sense for him to handle most of the day-to-day parenting duties. If the wife’s standard of cleanliness looks like a Home & Garden catalog, and the husband has gone six months without even noticing the light fixture hanging from the ceiling, then it makes sense that the wife handles more of the home cleaning duties.
One of the big problems with online dating for women is that, although there are genuine relationship-seeking men on the sites, there are also plenty of guys on there simply looking for sex. While most people would agree that on average men are more eager for sex than women, it seems that many men make the assumption that if a woman has an online dating presence, she’s interested in sleeping with relative strangers. Online dating does represent the convenience of being able to meet others that you possibly never would have otherwise, but women should be aware that they probably will receive rude/disgusting messages from horny guys, sexual propositions/requests, dick-pics, and a lot of creepy vibes.
If you’ve known each other for a while, you may assume that your partner has a pretty good idea of what you are thinking and what you need. However, your partner is not a mind-reader. While your partner may have some idea, it is much healthier to express your needs directly to avoid any confusion. Your partner may sense something, but it might not be what you need. What’s more, people change, and what you needed and wanted five years ago, for example, may be very different now. Getting in the habit of expressing your needs helps you weather difficult times, which otherwise may lead to increasing resentment, misunderstanding and anger.
Then after a month or two, we hit our first “rough patch” in the relationship. We fought more often, found ourselves getting annoyed with each other, and suddenly our multiple-times-per-day habit magically dried up. And it wasn’t just with her, but with me. To my surprised adolescent male mind, it was actually possible to have sex available to you yet not want it.
Chinese-style flirtatiousness is termed sajiao (Chinese: 撒娇; pinyin: sājiāo), best described as "to unleash coquettishness" with feminine voice, tender gestures, and girlish protestations.[90] Chinese women expect to be taken care of (Chinese: 照顾; pinyin: zhàogu) by men like a baby girl is doted on by an attentive and admiring father.[90] They wish to be almost "spoiled" (Chinese: 惯; pinyin: guàn) by a man buying gifts, entertainment, and other indulgences.[90] It's a positive sign of heartache (Chinese: 心疼; pinyin: xīnténg) when a man feels compelled to do "small caring things" for a woman without being asked such as pouring a glass of water or offering a "piggyback ride if she's tired."[90] These are signs of love and accepted romantic notions in China, according to one source.[90]
Each year, November 11 has become an unofficial holiday[87] known as China's Singles' Day when singles are encouraged to make an extra effort to find a partner.[88] Worried parents of unmarried children often arrange dates for their offspring on this day as well as others.[88] Before the day approaches, thousands of college students and young workers post messages describing their plans for this day. In Arabic numerals, the day looks like "1111", that is, "like four single people standing together", and there was speculation that it originated in the late 1990s when college students celebrated being single with "a little self-mockery"[87] but a differing explanation dates it back to events in the Roman Empire.[87] For many, Singles' Day offers people a way to "demonstrate their stance on love and marriage.[87]
Humans have been compared to other species in terms of sexual behavior. Neurobiologist Robert Sapolsky constructed a reproductive spectrum with opposite poles being tournament species, in which males compete fiercely for reproductive privileges with females, and pair bond arrangements, in which a male and female will bond for life.[4] According to Sapolsky, humans are somewhat in the middle of this spectrum, in the sense that humans form pair bonds, but there is the possibility of cheating or changing partners.[4] These species-particular behavior patterns provide a context for aspects of human reproduction, including dating. However, one particularity of the human species is that pair bonds are often formed without necessarily having the intention of reproduction. In modern times, emphasis on the institution of marriage, generally described as a male-female bond, has obscured pair bonds formed by same-sex and transgender couples, and that many heterosexual couples also bond for life without offspring, or that often pairs that do have offspring separate. Thus, the concept of marriage is changing widely in many countries.
×